Speaking Norwegian and Buying Insulation

Three days after bringing my beautiful trailer home to my sister’s driveway (where I can see it from my current bedroom window) I bought some insulation. I don’t even have a frame yet, but I have a whole lot of insulation.

Here’s how it goes down:

Gardening with my sister (read: my sister is gardening. I am probably making a mess with dirt). She checks her phone and sees that a friend was selling a bunch of doors and lumber and other bits and parts for building projects. So we head over to check it out. There are a few interesting things, but not much that I can use except a GIANT bundle of insulation. The tag on the top says $115.

I don’t have walls on my house yet. Do I really need insulation right now?

My sister tells Jeanette to call her if the insulation doesn’t sell by the end of the day. Then we start talking about all kinds of other things. Like building my tiny house and travel.

JeanetteJeanette mentions she’s headed to Norway this summer.

“Oh Norway!” I say dreamily. I can’t believe it, but I actually clasped my hands over my heart as I say it.
“You’ve been?” Jeanette asks.
I nod emphatically.
She grins. “Snakker du Norsk?”
“Jeg snakker ikke Norsk.” (I don’t speak Norwegian.)
Jeanette claps.
“I was taught only one other phrase and I was paraded around by my friends saying it to everyone.”
She waits.
“Jeg like fiskeboller.” (I like fish balls.)

We laugh and talk about traveling and she sends us off with some little wooden crates for free.

Ten minutes after getting back to our house and digging in the dirt again Adina gets a text from Jeanette. “We’ll sell the insulation to you for $50. Do you want it?”

And that’s how I managed to have insulation before having walls. The only mistake was taking my station wagon instead of my sister’s pickup.

Insulation2They also gave me a tiny door and some tile for FREE. I’m kind of obsessed with the tiny door.

Door-Tile